276°
Posted 20 hours ago

So Shall You Reap

£9.9£99Clearance
ZTS2023's avatar
Shared by
ZTS2023
Joined in 2023
82
63

About this deal

Brunetti’s Cookbook, recipes by Roberta Pianaro, culinary stories by Donna Leon (Published previously in the United Kingdom as A Taste of Venice: At Table with Brunetti, William Heinemann, London, April 2010; Atlantic Monthly Press, New York, hardcover, May 2010) I don't know if Leon will bring the pandemic into her next book, but here Venice is still okay, and this book has a lot less of the darkness--ecological woes and the Disneyfication of Venice--that most of her recent books have had. It has other dark themes, but not so much as to really send you reeling. Each visit with Guido is different. Sometimes it’s about the shop owners or residents or elderly or theft of art or government or political or navy The beauty for me in these books is in the little things, the details of everyday life and small interactions between the city’s people. An atmosphere is created of a place unchanged on the surface but ever changing underneath. Brunetti harbours a certain resentment in respect of the incremental changes ongoing in this place, but isn’t that true of all of us as we reach a certain age? And as the story settles into the investigation of a recognisable crime, he gathers those police officers close to him (characters well known to regular readers) and, between coffees, they ruminate on possible motives and root around to discover information that might lead them to a suspect. As always, it’s beautifully done and once more I experienced a pang of regret when I reached the story’s end and had to say farewell to these people and this place until (hopefully) the next book in the series is published.

En una fría noche de noviembre, Brunetti recibe una llamada del Inspector Vianello comunicando que ha aparecido una mano en uno de los canales de la ciudad. Poco después es encontrado el cuerpo, y se asigna a Brunetti la investigación de la muerte del hombre, un inmigrante de Sri Lanka con un sorprendente interés en el terrorismo italiano ocurrido durante los años 80. La investigación transportará a Brunetti a su etapa de estudiante y a aquellos ideales perdidos y errores de juventud en los que podría encontrarse la solución al caso. Fazio wasn’t sure what happened. He called me when they brought Alvise into the Questura. He asked me to come. And bring you,’ Vianello said.Gracias a su prosa descriptiva, Leon captura con pasmosa facilidad el pulso y el ritmo de Venecia, pero no de la Venecia atestada por hordas de turistas, si no de la Venecia real, la de aquellos que viven allí, siendo los momentos más memorables esos pequeños detalles del día a día, esas interacciones en apariencia irrelevantes, pero que permiten crear una atmósfera de un lugar que, aunque no cambia en su superficie, bajo esta se encuentra en continuo cambio. On a cold November evening, Guido Brunetti and Paola are up late when a call from his colleague Ispettore Vianello arrives, alerting the Commissario that a hand has been seen in one of Venice’s canals. The body is soon found, and Brunetti is assigned to investigate the murder of an undocumented Sri Lankan immigrant. Because no official record of the man’s presence in Venice exists, Brunetti is forced to use the city’s far richer sources of information: gossip and the memories of people who knew the victim. Curiously, he had been living in a small house on the grounds of a palazzo owned by a university professor, in which Brunetti discovers books revealing the victim’s interest in Buddhism, the revolutionary Tamil Tigers, and the last crop of Italian political terrorists, active in the 1980s. You become so wrapped up in these compelling characters . . . Each one is better than the last.”— Louise Erdrich, PBS NewsHour In the thirty-second installment of Donna Leon’s bestselling series, a connection to Guido Brunetti’s own youthful past helps solve a mysterious murder On a cold November evening, Guido Brunetti and Paola are up late when a call from his colleague Ispettore Vianello arrives, alerting the Commissario that a hand has been seen in one of Venice’s canals. The body is soon found, and Brunetti is assigned to investigate the murder of an undocumented Sri Lankan immigrant. Because no official record of the man’s presence in Venice exists, Brunetti is forced to use the city’s far richer sources of information: gossip and the memories of people who knew the victim. Curiously, he had been living in a small house on the grounds of a palazzo owned by a university professor, in which Brunetti discovers books revealing the victim’s interest in Buddhism, the revolutionary Tamil Tigers, and the last crop of Italian political terrorists, active in the 1980s. Brunetti paused a moment and searched his memory for any protest threatened for that weekend. Not the train drivers, not the remaining No-Vax, not the workers at Marghera – who seemed in a perpetual state of protest – and not medical professionals, who had protested two weeks before.

Donna Leon y el Comisario Brunetti llevan acompañándome más de media vida. Después de más de veinte años, leer cada una de sus nuevas novelas se ha convertido en una especie de ritual en el que reencontrarme con viejos amigos para ponernos al día. Desde hace ya unas cuantas entregas (“Cosecharás tempestades” es la número 32), la serie dejó de interesarme por los crímenes en sí (que también), si no que lo hace por sus maravillosos personajes, que ya siento casi como si fuesen familia. Después del sabor agridulce que me dejó la anterior entrega, me alegra comprobar que en esta ocasión Donna Leon vuelve en plena forma.Leon] has never become perfunctory, never failed to give us vivid portraits of people and of Venice, never lost her fine, disillusioned indignation.”— Ursula K. Le Guin, New York Times

Asda Great Deal

Free UK shipping. 15 day free returns.
Community Updates
*So you can easily identify outgoing links on our site, we've marked them with an "*" symbol. Links on our site are monetised, but this never affects which deals get posted. Find more info in our FAQs and About Us page.
New Comment