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Fantasy Flight Games - Imperial Assault Base Set - Board Game

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The mission itself plays out on a small board around which you need to hightail it to a console, open a door, get to a space cruiser, and most importantly, not let Luke die. Due to the confined nature of the board, it’s quite a fun mission because you have to balance the fact that the many, many stormtroopers will almost always have a line of sight to you. If you win, then the rebel players get to keep Luke as an additional character that they can choose to take on missions. In campaign missions, the Imperial player also has the advantage of knowing every secret that awaits as the mission progresses. The Rebels know only their next objective, and any number of surprises may lie ahead. Rebel Intelligence agents may discover Imperial codes behind a door, for example, but you won’t know if the codes are unguarded or if the open door will reveal a squad of stormtroopers. Following on from his wider thoughts on future expansions for Fantasy Flight games, Navaro responded to specific questions about why Star Wars: Imperial Assault had stopped receiving content, citing “business reasons” but suggesting that Imperial Assault had reached a natural 'completion'. 2. Is Imperial assault still supported? Talking of starship combat, it’s now time to talk about perhaps the greatest Star Wars board game in existence: Star Wars: Rebellion. Endorsed by Dicebreaker’s very own Wheels, Rebellion is an asymmetric board game featuring miniatures that allows players to experience the conflict between the Empire and Rebel forces in an incredibly well realised fashion.

In the campaign game, Imperial Assault invites you to play through a cinematic tale set in the Star Wars universe. One player commands the seemingly limitless armies of the Galactic Empire, threatening to extinguish the flame of the Rebellion forever. Up to four other players become heroes of the Rebel Alliance, engaging in covert operations to undermine the Empire’s schemes. Over the course of the campaign, both the Imperial player and the Rebel heroes gain new experience and skills, allowing characters to evolve as the story unfolds. As you can tell, the Galactic Civil War is a popular topic for Star Wars board games, possibly because many fans don’t have a huge amount of goodwill for the prequels and the latest trilogy has yet to receive its own decent dedicated board game. Star Wars: Empire vs. Rebellion is a card game that sees two players engage in a tense standoff as the respective Rebel and Empire forces. It might seem like a bold move to distill something as grand as the Galactic Civil War into a straightforward card game, but it actually does a surprisingly good job of recreating the feel of the original trilogy. What makes Rebellion so good is that it’s more than just a game about starship combat - although that element is certainly excellent enough. It’s also about depicting exactly what goes into fighting a war of this scale - from covert missions across the galaxy to searching for a hidden Rebel base. At the end of the day I have to give a high score because every time I play the game I have fun. It’s somehow captured the freewheeling spirit of the movies (ignoring the overwhelming and annoying too-seriousness from internet “fans”) without sacrificing too much strategic depth. The minis are great, and maybe 80% of the time the mission feels pretty balanced. Is this too low of a bar? Am I being too forgiving because it’s Star Wars? Probably. But if I want to play a deep, brilliantly designed hero story, I’ll pull out Mage Knight. If I want to blast some stormtroopers in the face and laugh, I’ll play Imperial Assault, despite its flaws.As you complete campaign missions, your options for future missions change based on the outcomes of past missions, ensuring that you’ll never play the same campaign twice. You may be forced to take unexpected side missions when your ship is impounded, or if you’re captured during a raid on an Imperial base. See, the Imperial player is given a certain amount of “threat” each round which they can spend on replenishing the Imperial forces on the map. This threat income is greater than what the Rebels can consistently kill each turn, so from the Rebel perspective it’s always, ultimately, a losing battle. Compounding this is the fact that usually one of the Imperial side’s win conditions is wounding all of the Rebel forces. Sometimes there’s even a strict time limit. The name of the game is speed and mobility, then. Rebels need to accomplish their goals before they’re inevitably beat down by the Imperials. Just don't be put off by the game's simplicity. Even though the rules are straightforward, it's not as easy as it sounds. That's because the illustrations are mixed up on each card, and they also come in varying sizes. This makes it satisfyingly challenging to find a match. In fact, there's nothing better than getting the answer a split-second ahead of your rivals. As you fly missions and smuggle cargo from system to system, your choices will shape your character. The cleverly linked mission cards give each game a cohesive but unique narrative. You'll upgrade your skills and ship along the way. But whether you choose to be a heroic rogue or a sky bounty hunter is up to you. Why not both? That's because they're in control of each scenario. Broadly speaking, anyway. From setup to game-end, team Empire is responsible for controlling all enemies, narrating the plot, and deploying any twists that come up during each mission. However, this doesn't give them too unfair an advantage. Despite being undeniably powerful, Imperial units can't hold a candle to the Rebellion's best and brightest. This hardened team will make short work of the average Storm Trooper, and our playtest featured a wookie warrior that was able to carve through their ranks like butter (all while shrugging off blaster fire like a furry Terminator).

In the campaign game, Imperial Assaultinvites you to play through a cinematic tale set in the Star Warsuniverse. One player commands the seemingly limitless armies of the Galactic Empire, threatening to extinguish the flame of the Rebellion forever. Up to four other players become heroes of the Rebel Alliance, engaging in covert operations to undermine the Empire’s schemes. Over the course of the campaign, both the Imperial player and the Rebel heroes gain new experience and skills, allowing characters to evolve as the story unfolds. A two-player miniatures game, Legion sees its players controlling forces in the Imperial and Rebel armies as they engage in full-on warfare. With mechanics designed simulate the ‘chaos of battle’ and a wide variety of units to choose from, Legion provides all the tools players need to re-enact whichever Star Wars skirmish they desire. You’ll also get a fine collection of miniatures to assemble and paint yourselves, which is great if you’re looking to get into the hobby or happen to already be a seasoned painting veteran.In Dark Side Rising two to four players must work together to thwart the evil machinations of plastic Darth Vader - his disembodied torso perches in the middle of the game board - as he attempts to build his ultimate weapon. Each player assumes control over a different Rebel cell - intelligence, leadership, support or tactical - as well as their own base of operations: Tatooine, Alderaan, Yavin 4 or Lothal. With resources and allies at their disposal, these players must strategically coordinate their efforts to defeat enough Imperial agents before it’s too late. As new threats arise, players will also be able to call on iconic Rebel allies like Leia Organa and Luke Skywalker for help. Which led us nicely into buying equipment (we didn’t), buying new abilities (we did), and heading off to our next campaign mission where we decided to try taking Luke along with us. Luke Isn’t That Useful The campaign game is an asymmetrical experience for 2 to 5 players. One player takes on the role of the Empire, summoning in troops and deploying disposable forces to take on the rebels. Any other players control a Rebel character, unique to this game. Over the course of many missions, both sides will be able to upgrade themselves. This style of play is similar to many roleplaying games, where one player takes on the role of a Game Master (the Empire). However, there is no self-created storytelling in Imperial Assault so it is more of a tactical skirmish game with a sense of progression. Three resources contribute to the sense of progression between missions. Both the Empire and Rebel players will receive XP for completing missions. Beyond that, Rebel players will receive Credits and the Imperial player will receive Influence. While all three are awarded after every mission, the rewards for the side that reached their goal in the mission will receive more numerous rewards. Players may also receive Reward cards for specific mission victories. Star Wars: Imperial Assault gives the Imperial player a choice of three ways to play. It ranges from straightforward to dastardly with a midway point somewhere in between. The Rebel player will always control at least two heroes depending on how many people are playing, with scope for a team of four to take on the Imperials. If there are less than three Rebel players then the heroes get a boost to their stats.

Star Wars: Imperial Assault is a strategy board game of tactical combat and missions for two to five players, offering two distinct games of battle and adventure in the Star Wars universe!Despite the inordinate amount of trash that populates the Star Wars board game galaxy like a drifting asteroid field, there are actually quite a few decent - nay! - even excellent examples of tabletop experiences set in the classic sci-fi universe. Whether you’re looking for a co-op board game filling in the gaps between Episode IV and V or a storytelling RPG where players can become powerful Jedi, here are the ten best Star Wars board games to play this Star Wars Day. Best Star Wars board games Armada extends the scope of X-Wing to a larger scale, with players assuming command of an entire fleet of ships - either Rebel Alliance or Galactic Empire - in an epic starship battle. Using a manoeuvre tool, players can steer their ships through the battlefield and engage with enemy units with the hope of shooting them down. The manoeuvrability of each ship entirely depends upon its size, with larger vessels being slower and more unwieldy but ultimately chunkier.

The third miniatures game on this list is one that focuses more on ground combat than X-Wing and Armada’s starship warfare. Star Wars: Legion is a miniatures game in the vein of Warhammer 40,000 designed to recreate iconic battles from the original trilogy, from the standoff at Hoth to the scuffle at Endor, in impressive detail. Including classic Star Wars infantry like stormtrooper units and iconic characters such as - you guessed it - Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker, Legion gives fans a lot to play around with. Good movie board games should be about skillfully recreating cinematic moments from the films they’re based on, which Star Wars: Imperial Assault accomplishes with absolute flourish. Set after the events seen in Episode IV: A New Hope, Imperial Assault has its players facing off against one another in an epic clash between the mighty Galactic Empire and scrappy Rebel Alliance.

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In the campaign game, Imperial Assaultinvites you to play through a cinematic tale set in the Star Wars universe. One player commands the seemingly limitless armies of the Galactic Empire, threatening to extinguish the flame of the Rebellion forever. Up to four other players become heroes of the Rebel Alliance, engaging in covert operations to undermine the Empire’s schemes. Over the course of the campaign, both the Imperial player and the Rebel heroes gain new experience and skills, allowing characters to evolve as the story unfolds. Publisher Fantasy Flight Games just recently called an end to its Star Wars: Destiny line of products, just three years after the collectible dice game first launched. Which is a damn shame because Destiny is actually a rather remarkable entry in the genre, with some interesting mechanics that made it more than just a card and dice game featuring classic Star Wars characters. In addition to surges, another currency available to the Rebels is strain, which can be spend to activate various character abilities and gain additional movement points. Strain management is the most compelling tactical part of the game from the Rebel perspective. Genuinely difficult decisions have to be made here, because while activating abilities is fun, and there are certainly going to be enough enemies to target, you need to make sure that you’re actually pursuing the goal of the mission. Spaceship combat in Star Wars is spectacular, but it's not where the real heart of the films is. That's in the unfolding story, the Jedi powers, the blaster battles. It's in Han and Leia, Luke and his father. If that's where you are with the movies, Imperial Assault is your game.

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